He who is without sin

The prophet Samuel’s death is recorded in 1 Samuel 25, and most scholars believe that David wrote the rest of that book and 2 Samuel, where he recorded in detail his sin with Bathsheba and the murder of her husband, Uriah. But Ezra, in recording the same events in 1 Chronicles, omits any reference to David’s sin, only stating that “David tarried at Jerusalem.” Ezra didn’t feel it was his place to bring David’s sin to remembrance.

When Noah landed on dry ground after the Flood, he got drunk on some fermented grape juice. Two of his sons, Shem and Japheth, carried a blanket into their father’s tent to cover him, walking backward, so as not to look upon his sin. But Ham brazenly gazed upon his father’s nakedness and possibly mocked him. God cursed Ham for his lack of discretion, but honored Shem and Japheth, not because they ignored their father’s sin, but because it was not their place to expose it.

We once took some recovering addicts from Celebrate Recovery to our church and made the mistake of telling people their status. Later, they asked us not to do this—they didn’t want to be “outed.” If they wanted others to know about their background, that was up to them, not us.

In John 8, the Pharisee’s brought to Jesus a woman caught in adultery. They wanted her stoned, according to the Law. But Jesus said, “He who is without sin among you, let him cast the first stone.” Then he stooped down and wrote in the sand, possibly naming their individual sins. Convicted by their conscience, the Pharisee’s dropped their stones and walked away. Jesus asked the woman, “Where are your accusers? Has no one condemned you?” When she answered “None,” Jesus said, “Neither do I condemn you; go and sin no more.”

Unless your name is Jesus, you don’t have the right to wag your finger and play Holy Spirit with people. Paul said in Galatians 6:1, warning people against correcting people in pride: “Brethren, if a man is overtaken in a sin, you who are spiritual restore such a one in a spirit of gentleness…”

The Father refuses to look upon our sin without seeing it through the Blood of His Son, that is, through the Mercy Seat. It’s called that for a reason. Only a merciful God, seeing our sin through the Blood, is qualified to “out” us.

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